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Classic watches, watchmaking, antique tools, history, vintage ephemera and more!

Learn about mechanical timepieces and how they work, the history of the American watch industry and especially all about the Elgin National Watch Company! Check back for new content daily.

Although this is technically a blog, the content is not generally in a time-based sequence. You can find interesting items throughout. Down the page some is an alphabetical word cloud of keywords used here. A great way to dig in is to look through those topics and click anything you find interesting. You'll see all the relevant content.

Here are a few of my favorites!

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Elgin Advertising, 1925

ELGIN
TIME KEEPER TO THE SUCCESSFUL

Soon I called it my "old reliable" - and in forty years it has never failed me

One of a series of little biographies of Elgin Watches
WRITTEN BY EMINENT ELGINEERS

An experience as a commuter is very apt to give any man a high respect for an accurate watch.  For a commuter soon learns that a fickle time-piece may lead to calamity; such as a lost business engagement in town or a cold dinner at home.

While practicing law in the city of Chicago, I was commuting each day from Wheaton, Illinois, and an erratic watch was a source of frequent apprehension to me.

One day - in 1885 - I missed my train.  And it was then that I decided to acquire an Elgin - purchasing it from Giles & Company, then a Chicago landmark.

It was a Number Fifty model in a heavy gold case, recommended to withstand even the rigors of commuting...  Soon I called it my "old reliable" - and in these forty years it has never failed me.

It still keeps correct time, and is always "on call" when my present-day watch - a much handsomer and thinner Elgin - is sent away for cleaning.
 - by ELBERT H. GARY
ELGIN
THE WATCH WORD FOR ELEGANCE AND EFFICIENCY
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