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CPA Report on Tin Conservation

From The American Horologist and Jeweler magazine, July, 1946

CPA Report on Tin Conservation

The Civilian Production Administration today advised manufacturers of jewelry and other novelty and luxury items that they must continue to be guided by the restrictions of the tin conservation order (M-43) in their output of these products.

Jewelry manufactured from tin has appeared in constantly increasing quantities in many retail stores' since V-J Day, the agency said. Many wholesalers and retailers seem to be under the impression that CPA Order M-43 has been withdrawn or relaxed. Tin conservation is still a "must" item, CPA emphasized, and Order M-43 remains in full force and will continue effective until the tin situation eases.

CPA said that the use of any metal containing 11/2 percent or more of tin is prohibited in the manufacture of jewelry, buttons, novelties and ornamental articles.

Manufacturers, wholesalers, jobbers or retailers may not buy or sell such articles containing tin unless the seller has authorization from the Civilian Production Administration to sell the particular item offered.

The Compliance Division of the Civilian Production Administration is investigating this situation.
Contributing to the trade perplexities regarding the tin situation are the stories that have appeared recently in some magazines to the effect that in formation received from Washington indicates that the improved tin supply will make possible the use of white metal by manufacturers for the production of tin-containing jewelry.


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