Welcome!

Classic watches, watchmaking, antique tools, history, vintage ephemera and more!

Learn about mechanical timepieces and how they work, the history of the American watch industry and especially all about the Elgin National Watch Company! Check back for new content daily.

Although this is technically a blog, the content is not generally in a time-based sequence. You can find interesting items throughout. Down the page some is an alphabetical word cloud of keywords used here. A great way to dig in is to look through those topics and click anything you find interesting. You'll see all the relevant content.

Here are a few of my favorites!

There are some large images on some posts, so that might impact your load times, bit I think you will find it worth the wait. Thanks for visiting!

OPA Price Revision

From The American Horologist and Jeweler magazine, October, 1946

OPA Price Revision

Effective, August 19, 1946, a Price revision of clocks and watches with less than 7 jewel was established by the Office of Price Administration.

The amended order now stands as follows:

1. The second paragraph of section 2 (a) is amended to read as follows:
This order does not cover electric clock motors without time trains, timing devices or clock systems which are under RMPR 136, watches or clocks with 7 or more jewels, clock and watches with imported movements which are under the MIPR or RMPR 499, respectively, or used clocks and watches which are covered by the GMPR and MPR 429.
2. Section 4 is amended to read as follows:
Sec. 4. Retail ceiling prices. This section provides for the determination of retail ceiling prices of clocks and watches covered by this order. Manufacturers, except in the case of articles which are sold only to another manufacturer, are required to calculate the retail ceiling prices of their products in accordance with the provisions of this section and to comply with the tagging provisions of section 7.
(a) The retail ceiling price of any clock or watch which the manufacturer delivered to a purchaser for resale prior to August 19, 1946, shall be the retail ceiling price computed in accordance with the provisions of this order as in effect on May 13, 1946.
The retail ceiling price for any clock or watch which the manufacturer· delivers to a purchaser for resale on or after August 19, 1946, shall be determined in accordance with the following provisions of this section:
(1) The retail ceiling price is the "manufacturer's price" to a wholesaler plus the applicable one of the following percentages, the total to be adjusted to the nearest 5 cents:
(i) 77% in the case of watches and spring-wound clocks for which the manufacturer's price is less than $2.90;
(ii) 91% in the case of watches and spring-wound clocks for which the "manufacturer's price" is $2.90 or more but less than $5.56; and electric clocks for which the "manufacturer's price" is less than $5.56;
(iii) 116% in the case of watches and clocks for which the "manufacturer's price" is $5.56 or more.
(2) The retail ceiling price for a watch or clock for which the manufacturer does not have a maximum price to a wholesaler but does have a maximum price to a retailer shall be the manufacturer's price to a retailer plus a markup which will yield the retailer the same percentage margin as the discount which a wholesaler is required to give a retailer by section 5 (b) of this order, the total to be adjusted to the nearest :: cents. 
(3) The applicable Federal excise tax upon the retail price may be collected in addition 'to the ceiling prices determined in accordance with this section.
3. Section 5 is amended to read as follows:
See. 5. Wholesalers' ceiling prices. A wholesaler's ceiling price for a clock or watch which the manufacturer delivered to a purchaser for resale prior to August 19, 1946, shall be the wholesaler's ceiling price computed ill accordance with the provisions of this section as in effect on May 13, 1946.
A wholesaler's ceiling price for a clock or watch which the manufacturer delivers to a purchaser for resale on and after August 19, 1946, shall be the wholesale ceiling price calculated by the manufacturer in accordance with the following' provisions of this section:
(a) A manufacturer whose published price list in effect in October 1941 showed different prices for sales by wholesalers in small and large quantities shall determine the wholesale ceiling price for sales in smallest quantities by deducting from the retail ceiling price (exclusive of the Federal excise tax) the applicable one of the following discounts:
(1) 29% in the case of watches and spring-wound clocks for which the manufacturer's price is less than $2.90;
(2) 32% in the case of watches and spring-wound clocks for which the manufacturer's price is $2.90 or more, but less than $5.56; and electric clocks for which the manufacturer's price is less than $5.56;
(3) 37% in the case of watches and clocks for which the manufacturer's price is $5.56 or more.
The manufacturer shall calculate wholesalers' ceiling prices for sales in larger quantities by applying to the wholesale ceiling prices for sales in smallest quantities the differentials contained in his October, 1941 price list for sales in such larger quantities.
(b) A manufacturer who had no published price list in effect during October, 1941 or whose price list did not show different prices for sales by wholesalers in small and large quantities shall determine the wholesale ceiling price for sales of all quantities by applying to the retail ceiling price (exclusive of the Federal excise tax) the applicable one of the following discounts:
(1) 30.5% in the case of watches and spring-wound clocks for which the manufacturer's price is less than $2.90;
(2) 34% in the case of watches and· spring-wound clocks for which the manufacturer's price is $2.90 or more but less than $5.56; and electric clocks for which the manufacturer's price is less than $5.56.
(3) 38.5'% in the case of watches and clocks for which the manufacturer's price IS $5.56 or more.

PAUL A. PORTER, Administrator. 

Post a Comment

Click "Older Posts" just above for more, or use the archive links right here.

Blog Archive