Welcome!

Classic watches, watchmaking, antique tools, history, vintage ephemera and more!

Learn about mechanical timepieces and how they work, the history of the American watch industry and especially all about the Elgin National Watch Company! Check back for new content daily.

Although this is technically a blog, the content is not generally in a time-based sequence. You can find interesting items throughout. Down the page some is an alphabetical word cloud of keywords used here. A great way to dig in is to look through those topics and click anything you find interesting. You'll see all the relevant content.

Here are a few of my favorites!

There are some large images on some posts, so that might impact your load times, bit I think you will find it worth the wait. Thanks for visiting!

Imports Seen Detrimental

From The American Horologist magazine, May, 1945

Imports Seen Detrimental

Albert Potter, president of the Elgin National Watch Co., disclosed recently that the greater portion of his company's output went directly to the government for the year 1944.

The company has made sparing distribution to the trade from a diminishing stockpile of civilian watches, he revealed.

Imports of foreign watches are depriving American watch makers of the backlog of accumulated postwar demand to which most mother industries look forward, he pointed out. Even though lack of shipping curtailed imports during the year, enough foreign-made watches were brought in for immediate public demand.

"We, in conjunction with other American watch manufacturers, have presented our problem to the government with the expectation that when we are again manufacturing civilian watches some adequate equalization of imports may be devised. This will permit us to more quickly regain our channels of distribution," he said.

The company's war products include a new type ship's chronometer with removable escapement, special watches, chronographs, t i m in g mechanisms, mechanical time fuses .for anti-aircraft projectiles and critical jewels for precision instruments. 


Post a Comment

Click "Older Posts" just above for more, or use the archive links right here.

Blog Archive