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Hairspring Expert Uses Seven Vibrators

From Horology magazine, September, 1938

Hairspring Expert Uses Seven Vibrators 

Miss I. A. Burki, Los Angeles hairspring specialist, states that the continually diminishing size of wrist watches has somewhat complicated the fitting of hairsprings. No longer is there just one standard of 18,000 vibrations per hour, but in order to accommodate the great range of beats now being used she uses seven different standard vibrators.


Born in Switzerland, the center of the watch manufacturing industry, Miss Burki early showed mechanical inclinations and studied hairspring work at a horological institute. Then after working for a year in her father's watch factory, she decided to come to America.

She thereupon came to New York and for six years was employed by the Bulova Watch Company where her brother is manager of the watch department. Later she went to Chicago, staying there for about two years, but seeking a change of climate left for Los Angeles where she has now been for about three years. 


During all this time Miss Burki applied herself assiduously to hairspring work and today is highly respected for her skill in manipulating the tiniest of springs, performing many operations which fine horologists would consider difficult. She takes quite an interest, in horological developments and is an active member of the Horological Association of California. The accompanying photo shows her at her bench in the act of fitting a spring.

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