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Learn about mechanical timepieces and how they work, the history of the American watch industry and especially all about the Elgin National Watch Company! Check back for new content daily.

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A Watch For A Giantess

From Horology magazine, September, 1938

A Watch For A Giantess

Imagine a dainty wrist watch weighing 3 ~ pounds! Just such a timepiece, a much enlarged replica of a diamond set Elgin, will be on view in the Elgin exhibit at the National Credit Jewelers Convention.

If the "gems" of this mammoth chronometer were real, each would weigh 500 karats. The "grande dame" who would wear it would tip the freight scales at little more than a ton. Her altitude would be a mere 96 feet. Her elegant little evening sandals would be ' in the fashionable size 90. And her petite hands would be garaged (probably with the aid of a traveling crane) in a neat size 117 glove.

Madame's waist would measure a perfect 40~, but you would have to measure in feet. Her pert little head, with its mop of curly baling wire-we mean "hair"-would look too divine in a tiny chapeau, size 444, no less and no more. Hose length would be something a little less than 13 yards.

And think of the charming scene when the fair owner of this mighty Elgin extended her arms some 95 feet, and wrapped them around the "boy friend," as he presented her with an engagement ring, size 99!

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